•  
  •  
Edu-fact check
Every now and then we come across a claim about schools that doesn't add up. My School data helps us call it for what it is. See our latest and our categories below.

Latest:  Private school girls most likely to go to uni
In fairness there might be more to this research coming out of the ANU - but the report on it reads like the bleeding obvious. There is no excuse for NOT using ICSEA data to give a balanced perspective to such research.  
It just reads like   
Edu-fluff 

OUR CATEGORIES
Edu-fact: confirmed by evidence
Edu-fiction: not supported by facts
Edu-fable: not quite the whole story 
Edu-falsehood: basically a lie
Edu-fabrication: a constructed lie       
Edu-fallacy:well-intentioned but wrong
Edu-feasible: could be something in it
Edu-foible: a rather silly statement
Edu-fantasy: a figment of imagination
Edu-fiddle: a half-truth 
Edu-faith: belief rather than evidence
Edu-furphy: a bit of a rumour
Edu-fluff: statement that adds little
Edu-fallshort: doesn't go far enough
Edu-fib: let's call it what it is!

Please email Chris if you want to challenge any findings. One resource we use is School Daze, which also includes many of the graphs we'll show on this site. 

School Daze sections:
A school is a school - or is it?
Mind the gap - it's getting wider
Mind the gap - it's getting deeper
Australia's school equity problem
Our equity problem - over time & place
Student achievement is drifting
Myth busting - school results
Those distinguished HSC achievers
The money-ro-round
More myths - private schools save $
And more - money doesn't lift results
The illusion of school choice
Where did the school community go?
Edu-Latest
APRIL 2017
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Edu-comment:  The fun bits about school funding are the claims by the Victorian non-gov lobbies. There aren't enough 'f' words to describe what they say....I've added 'fibs' to the collection on the left. They have given me weeks of edu-fact check material. At least the Catholic groups acknowledge My School data - even if Stephen Elder gives it a twist. The Independents' contribution exists in some parallel universe! 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  
MARCH 2017
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Edu-comment: I've had a quick read of the Mitchell Institute's  'Preparing young people for the future of work'. It's about the need to transform senior secondary education and revitalise apprenticeships. But they ignore innovative school designs that are successfully linking school curriculum and work. I'm over reports which reframe problems without investigating working solutions....including as shown on ABC Lateline this week.       
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Edu-comment: The above two reports should be read together. We have known for years about the imbalance in, and regressive impact of, selective schools. They are NSW public education's own special contribution to inequity. Time to start dismantling them and shift the opportunities for their students to an online platform.    
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Want to see Edu-Latest going back to 2008? Click here

Edu-graph This is the graph (from The vanishing private school) which tells the real story about where government funding goes, by school sector and ICSEA band. The most striking feature is that – as we would expect – higher rates of funding are applied to schools in the lower ICSEA ranges, and conversely reducing toward the higher, more advantaged end.

The numbers in brackets below the graph indicate the sample size in each category.  The school and student numbers in the lower ICSEA bands are relatively small and these are mostly government schools.

A brief inspection shows that two-thirds of all schools are to be found in the ICSEA ranges from 950 to 1149.  Within this zone, the government funding per student within each range varies little from sector to sector. 
About us
This site monitors media comment and research on the educational issues that matter. To contribute your sources and links email Chris:  bonnorc@gmail.com

Edu-links

We'll include links from time to time. Do keep in touch with Save Our Schools. Trevor Cobbold's research is compelling and his site has excellent links to other sites.


Other sites keep track of new articles, reports and research on schools. These include the TJ Ryan Foundation, The Conversation and Australian Policy Online


Edu-Publications
Here are the widely reported stories about Australia's schools, from my work with Bernie Shepherd.

OUR LATEST is The Vanishing Private School, published end of January 2017 and reported in The Guardian. 

September 2016: Institutionalised Inequality Published in Inside Story

June 2016: Uneven playing field: the state of Australian schools released by the Centre for Policy Development.

March 2016:
School Daze - what My School really says about our schools.

February 2016:
...and half a story doesn't fit the facts. Our response to One school does not fit all, issued by the Centre for Independent Studies. 

July 16th 2015:
'Private school, public cost' - Findings from My School 2015. First report in the SMH

Equity in Australian schooling - an update. (October 2014) What Gonski found to be bad we have found to be worse. Reports about it here and here. Also in Inside Story. UPDATED My School 6 version now available: Gonski, My School and the Education Market.

The public and private of student achievement (December 2014) Schools with similar students get similar results. Reported in the Sun Herald.

School funding and achievement - following the money trail (February 2015) Similar schools get similar results, so what does it cost? Read the main media report and our oped in the Guardian Australia.


Is the idea of a school community - at least in a geographic sense - a myth? Just a quarter of our schools have an enrolment that reflects their locality.